General Flood Information

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More than 100 Attend Joint County, City Storm Water Meeting

Friday, July 18, 2014 - 12:48pm

A joint meeting was held on July 18 at the Pensacola Bay Center, of which all County Commissioners, Mayor Hayward and City Council members were in attendance. More than 100 citizens attended the meeting to hear a presentation by J. David Waggoner, FAIA, and discuss storm water issues. Public input was also given on the subject and presentations were also given by County Administrator Jack Brown and City Administrator Colleen Castille regarding efforts to improve drainage systems in our community.

Local Services

For assistance with flood zone determination:

• Escambia County: (850) 595-3553

• City of Pensacola: (850) 436-5600

• Santa Rosa Island Authority: (850) 932-2257

For an elevation certificate:

• Escambia County: (850) 595-3550

• City of Pensacola: (850) 436-5600

• Pensacola Beach: (850) 932-2257

To determine if you live in a storm surge area, call Escambia County’s Emergency Management office at (850) 471-6400 or see Escambia County storm surge maps.

Flood Insurance

Nearly 20,000 Escambia County residents have flood insurance. In 1968, Congress created the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) to help provide a means for property owners to financially protect themselves. The NFIP offers flood insurance to homeowners, renters and business owners if their community participates in the NFIP. Participating communities agree to adopt and enforce ordinances that meet or exceed FEMA requirements to reduce the risk of flooding.

Floodplains

Floodplains are areas where water can collect to provide holding areas until the water has the opportunity to seep into the ground, replenishing our water table and creating natural habitat for wildlife and plant life.  A floodplain includes wetlands, marshes, lakes and rivers.

What is a Flood?

Aside from fire, floods are the most widespread of all natural disasters.  Most communities in the United States can experience some kind of flooding, from events such as spring rains, heavy thunderstorms or winter snow thaws.  Floods can be slow or fast rising but generally develop over a period of days.

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